Weekly Seminar: Gregory Leo, “Taking Turns” (Sep 22, 2016)

gregoryleoWe would like to announce that Gregory Leo will be giving the first of our fall 2016 weekly seminar series, on September 22, 2016. He will be discussing his paper, “Taking Turns”.

Gregory Leo uses game theory and experimental methods to study economic problems. Two of his main research projects include studying the coordination dilemmas that arise when the effort of a few people can benefit many and how to efficiently match people into teams or groups in various environments. Gregory joined the faculty at Vanderbilt university in 2015 after earning his PhD from the University of California Santa Barbara.

The talk will be held at the NYU Economics department, in room 517. If you have any questions regarding this talk, or any in our series, please email cess@nyu.edu.

Weekly seminar – 30th October, 2014

Shachar Kariv
Shachar Kariv

On Thursday, 30th October 2014, 12:30pm, Shachar Kariv, professor at University of California, Berkeley, will present a seminar on the topic: “Distinguishing Nonstationarity from Inconsistency in Intertemporal Choice.”

Shachar Kariv was educated at Tel-Aviv University and New York University, where he received his PhD in 2003, the same year he joined Berkeley’s economics department. Professor Kariv is the Faculty Director of UC Berkeley Experimental Social Science Laboratory (Xlab), a laboratory for conducting experiment-based investigations of issues of interest to social sciences. He is the recipient of the UC Berkeley Division of Social Sciences Distinguished Teaching Award (2008) and yahoo password change the Graduate Economics Association Outstanding Advising Award (2006).

Weekly seminar – 9th October, 2014

Alexander Stremitzer
Alexander Stremitzer

On 9th October, Thursday, 12:30pm, Alexander Stremitzer, Assistant Professor at UCLA Law will be discussion on his paper “Promises and Expectations,” joint with Florian Ederer.

Before joining UCLA’s faculty in 2011, Alexander Stremitzer was assistant professor of economics at the University of Bonn and visiting assistant professor at Yale Law School and in Yale University’s economics department. He also spent extended research visits at ETH Zurich and Columbia University‘s Center for Contracts and Economic how to use az screen recorder ract theory, and comparative law. In addition to works in German, Professor Stremitzer’s recent scholarly work in English has been published in several journals including the Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, The Journal of Institutional and Theoretical Economics, and The Yale Law Journal.

Professor Stremitzer earned a Masters’ degree in International Management at  HEC-Paris in 2000, and in 2003, received a Ph.D., with distinction, in Business Economics from Vienna University of Economics and Business Administration.  Professor Stremitzer earned a J.D. in 2006 from the University of Vienna.

Weekly seminar – 8th May, 2014

Salvatore Nunnari
Salvatore Nunnari

Salvatore Nunnari from Columbia University, on 8th May, 12:30pm, will be discussion on topic,”Gambler’s Fallacy and Imperfect Best Response in Legislative Bargaining,” joint with Jan Zapal.

Salvatore is an Assistant Professor of Political Science at Columbia University. His research is in formal political theory, political economy, and experimental political science. In particular, he uses game theory and laboratory experiments to study legislative bargaining, the provision of public goods, and the effect of political institutions on economic and political outcomes. He is the Associate Director of the  Columbia Experimental Laboratory in the Social Sciences. He organizes the Columbia Political Economy Seminar in the Spring and the Columbia Political Economy Breakfast in the Fall.

Weekly seminar – 24th April, 2014

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Dirk Engelmann

On Thursday, 24th April, 12:30pm, Dirk Engelmann from the University of Mannheim, Germany, will be discussing on his paper, “Who Cares for Social Image?” joint with Jana Friedrichsen.

Dirk Engelmann is Professor of Economics at the University of Mannheim and Director of the Experimental Economics Laboratory mLab. He received his doctoral degree in 2000 from Humboldt University Berlin. From 2003 to 2004 he was Assistant Professor at CERGE-EI (Prague). From 2004 to 2006 he was Reader, from 2006 to 2010 Professor of Economics at Royal Holloway, University of London. He is a member of the editorial board of the American Economic Review, associate editor of The Economic Journal and co-editor of the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization.