Fall 2016: CESS  Experimental Economics Seminar

Weekly Seminar: Theo Offerman, “Fight or Flight” (joint work with Boris van Leeuwen and Jeroen van de Ven) (December 15th, 2016)
theo-1Theo Offerman combines (game) theory and experimental methods to study economic problems.  In the past he worked a lot on applications in auctions.  In recent work, he studies the power and limits of strategic communication.  Theo is affiliated with CREED at the University of Amsterdam, and he has fond memories of the past NYU/UvA PhD workshops  that he organized with Andy Schotter and Guillaume Fréchette.
Weekly Seminar: Emanuel Vespa,”Contingent Preferences and the Sure-Thing Principle: Revisiting Classic Anomalies in the Laboratory” (December 1st, 2016)

emanuelvespaEmanuel Vespa
is an experimental economist who studies behavior in economic environments using laboratory data. Most of his research is on dynamic games and on contingent thinking. Emanuel joined the faculty at the University of California Santa Barbara after earning his Ph.D. from New York University in 2012. He is currently visiting Stanford University for the academic year.

 

Weekly Seminar: Joshua Miller, “Surprised by the Gambler’s and Hot Hand Fallacies? A Truth in the Law of Small Numbers,” (joint with Adam Sanjurjo) November 17th, 2016

joshua-miller-pic

We would like to announce that Joshua B. Miller will be giving the next talk in our fall 2016 weekly seminar series, on November 17, 2016.  In this talk Joshua will be discussing his paper, “Surprised by the Gambler’s and Hot Hand Fallacies? A Truth in the Law of Small Numbers,” (joint w/ Adam Sanjurjo) along with some exciting new results on this topic.  An earlier version of this paper was featured in the Wall Street Journal, the New York Times, the New YorkerNew York Magazine, and other media outlets.

Weekly Seminar: Attila Ambrus, “Experiments on Spatial Bargaining” (joint work with Ben Greiner) (November 3rd, 2016)

attila-ambrusAttila Ambrus is a Professor of Economics at Duke University, and a Research Economist at the NBER.  His research spans across topics in microeconomic theory, game theory, experimental economics, political economy and development economics, and include bargaining, strategic communication and delegation, group decision-making, coalition formation, and risk-sharing arrangements on social networks.  Dr. Ambrus serves as an associate editor of the Journal of Economic Theory, the International Journal of Game Theory, and the Review of Economic Design.  He received his Ph.D. in Economics at Princeton University, and his B.A. at the Budapest University of Economics.

Weekly Seminar: Gregory Leo, “Taking Turns” (Sep 22, 2016)

gregoryleo

We would like to announce that Gregory Leo will be giving the first of our fall 2016 weekly seminar series, on September 22, 2016. He will be discussing his paper, “Taking Turns”.

Gregory Leo uses game theory and experimental methods to study economic problems. Two of his main research projects include studying the coordination dilemmas that arise when the effort of a few people can benefit many and how to efficiently match people into teams or groups in various environments. Gregory joined the faculty at Vanderbilt university in 2015 after earning his PhD from the University of California Santa Barbara.

The talk will be held at the NYU Economics department, in room 517. If you have any questions regarding this talk, or any in our series, please email cess@nyu.edu.

Weekly Seminar: Ragan Petrie, “Kinks in Rationality” (Oct 6th, 2016)

ragan_petrie

We would like to announce that Ragan Petrie will be giving the second of our fall 2016 weekly seminar series talks, on October 6th, 2016. Her talk is entitled,  “Kinks in Rationality.”

Ragan Petrie is an Associate Professor of Economics at Texas A&M  University. Her research interests include experimental economics and applied microeconomics, including charitable giving, bargaining and gender. She has published in the American Economic Review, the Journal of Public Economics and the Journal of Risk and Uncertainty.  Dr. Petrie serves as co-editor of the Journal of Economic Behavior and Organization as well as an associate editor of the Southern Economic Journal and the Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics.  She received her Ph.D. in Economics and Agricultural and Applied Economics from the University of Wisconsin, Madison and holds a M.P.A. in Economics and Public Policy from the University of Pittsburgh and a B.A. in French from the University of Illinois.

Weekly Seminar: Paul J. Healy, “Epistemic Experiments: Utility Elicitation and Irrational Play” (Oct 20, 2016)

P.J. Healy

We would like to announce that Paul J. Healy will be giving the next talk in our fall 2016 weekly seminar series, on October 20, 2016. In this talk P.J. will be discussing his paper,“Epistemic Experiments: Utility Elicitation and Irrational Play”.

P.J. Healy’s research combines both theory and experiments. He has written several papers on implementation and mechanism design, as well as work on repeated games, overconfidence, Bayesian updating, and behavioral game theory. His recent work uses extensive elicitation procedures to measure the thought processes behind strategic decision-making. P.J. earned his PhD from Caltech in 2005. He served as an assistant professor in Carnegie Mellon’s Tepper School of Business before moving to Ohio State in 2007.